Monday, April 2, 2012

Who Do You Want To Be? by SC Chen

Are you at a crossroad in life where you wish to find out more about your career path? Lately, the economic uncertainties have enforced job seekers like myself to consider an instant 'make-over' of our preferred career paths and find ourselves with the reality to transform our lives.

It is an interesting journey of discovery if you have the audacity to take this trip. When times are good, job opportunities are in abundance and you can build your career along the line of your tertiary qualifications. However, when economic slowdown looms in, stories of retrenchments, cost-cutting exercises and mergers of conglomerates into smaller groups with lean and mean corporate structure tend to build a sense of uncertainty for job seekers in the employment market.

Whatever is the reason for you to be looking for a new job now, whether due to personal reason or looking for greater challenges or you are a fresh graduate, firstly, you need to create a better self-awareness and start to look honestly at what is going on with your lives and those around you. Far more important than the make-up and clothes and our external adornments is the realisation that you have to be responsible for your own career life. It is always better to work on who you want to be as compared to what you want to do or how you want to look. I have learnt that once you have the inclination of what kind of person you want to be, you will be driven to fulfil that vision.

Shortly after I left my last job, I found out that I wanted to do something that would enrich people's lives. However I did not have any idea what that job would be: I did not have in mind the question of "what I want to do". But through my freelance writing assignments with Jobstreet.com, I have discovered that I am able to fulfil that desire with the intention that my articles will inspire readers to be more proactive and be in control of their career paths, whether during economic boom or bust.

There is a sense of fulfilment that you are impacting people's lives and sharing experiences and information with other fellow job seekers. I am no longer bound to introduce myself with a job title. It has a liberating sense because the possibility of you doing greater things is limitless. And the best part is that you enjoy the work because there is the manifestation of your true self and it is being channeled through your work. I am still finding more about my direction daily. So, I would encourage you to examine your thoughts that put you where you are today and how to move forward to realise your right career path.
  • What is your calling?
    In other words, what on earth are here for? I would not be surprised if most of us do not put much thought into this matter and instead, we allow the parental or societal preferences to dictate the course of our lives. The much infamous professions, for example, doctor, lawyer and accountant, are much adored as compared to a profession in nursing, designing or teaching. How do find your calling? You will know by a feeling inside you, that pulls you to the highest part of yourself. A calling is not a job title. You may be a doctor but your calling could be specifically to reach out and provide healthcare to the poor.
  • Job title vs job description
    It is interesting to note that we pay more attention to the title of a job when we look for prospective jobs. Nice sounding job titles can be quite misleading and based on my experience, there is a need for job seekers to pay more attention to the job descriptions or responsibilities. Matching a job to the applicant via a personality test is to gauge the suitability of your personality to handle the job or the person that you will be working closely with. Such tests tend to be rigid and incomprehensive but then again, it goes to prove my earlier point of the need to find out more about ourselves, that is, our personality vis-à-vis the personality of the right person for the position. Therefore, with the knowledge of who you want to be, you can save yourself the time and money in applying for job openings which may not be suitable to you and instead, zero in on the ones that are.
  • Be bold and courageous
    If you are one of those that has been retrenched, laid off or given your VSS and now, you are wondering what you are going to do next, especially with the tight job market and a lower expectation on salary payout, this is the time for you to be bold and courageous. You may wish to start your own business if you have the working capital, expertise and knowledge of who you want to be. Nobody promises that it will be smooth sailing but it may serve to be the best time for you to realise your dream job.

    "Hold fast to dreams, for if dreams die, life is a broken-winged bird that cannot fly."- Langston Hughes.
Have you considered changing your line of work altogether, yet unable to break away from the security of the familiar work style and venture into the unknown? If you are out of job for a while, you may want to consider going into a different field of work, so long that you are achieving your purpose of who you want to be. I trust that everything happens for a reason even though we are not wise enough to see it or it is not apparent. There is a time and season for everything that happens in your life. The question is, "Can you revolve with the changing season and assimilate it to your career goals?"

Who do you want to be?



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